If you are seeking food for yourself or your family or if you know someone who is dealing with hunger, we are ready to lend a helping hand. Please refer to the GET SUPPORT page or simply give us a call.

Last year, 672 individuals looked to the Food Bank for help on a repeat basis, 40 per cent of them children. The reasons may be temporary or ongoing: low wages; unemployment; or government assistance programs and pensions that fall short of expenses.

Beyond providing food, the Food Bank is committed to making connections to other agencies and programs, providing advice in times of crisis, fostering self-esteem through participation, sharing its commercial kitchen and supporting the struggle for social justice.

The Centre Wellington Food Bank is a member of The Ontario Association of Food Banks and Food Banks Canada.


Community Commercial Kitchen

This state-of-the-art facility has been planned to serve the community at large and to accommodate a range of different user groups.

  • Volunteers preparing client meals to be frozen in vacuum-sealed portions.
  • Guidance for Food Bank clients on cooking nutritious, cost-effective meals with fresh and pantry items.
  • Neighbouring food banks and local charities for helping their clients.
  • Service clubs and groups making food for fundraisers or special events.
  • Caterers working on large social events.
  • Food-based entrepreneurs for testing, production and presentations.

Equipment includes two heavy duty four-burner gas ranges, two gas convection ovens, a heavy duty griddle, a two-litre mixer, a vacuum sealer, a two-minute-cycle dishwasher, professional pots, pans and baking sheets and two large stainless steel prep tables.

The Community Commercial Kitchen was made possible by a grant from the Wellington-Waterloo Community Futures Development Corporation. Contact the Food Bank for further information and any applicable fees.



In 1984, just a few years after Canada’s first food bank opened in Edmonton, several churches came together to establish a food pantry in the basement of Melville United Church. By 1997, the volume of food distributed, number of clients served and roster of volunteers had grown to the point where the Centre Wellington Food Bank needed to hire a manager.

The charity moved several times before settling in 2009 in its present home in the historic Fergus Marketplace in Fergus. To reduce operating costs and ensure continuity, the Food Bank purchased the premises in 2013.

The majority of our funds come from individual, group and business donations and fundraising events. The Centre Wellington Food Bank is also grateful to the support of the United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin and grants from the Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation, Wellington County and the Township of Centre Wellington.